Woody Pines

Down Home Swing

 

 

HAPPY BIRTHDAY DOCK BOGGS FEB 7th 1898

Dock was an influential old-time singer, songwriter and banjoplayer. His style of banjo playing, as well as his singing, is considered a unique combination of Appalachian folk music and African-American blues. Contemporary folk musicians and performers consider him a seminal figure, at least in part because of the appearance of two of his recordings from the 1920s, "Sugar Baby" and "Country Blues", on Harry Smith's 1951 Anthology of American Folk Music collection. Boggs was initially recorded in 1927 and again in 1929, although he worked primarily as a coal miner for most of his life. He was "rediscovered" during the folk music revival of the 1960s, and spent much of his later life playing at various folk music festivals and recording for Folkways Records.[1]

01 - Sugar Baby
02 - Down South Blues ( 2:55 )
03 - Country Blues ( 06:05 )
04 - Sammie, where have you been so long! ( 09:09 )
05 - Danville girl ( 12:15 )
06 - Pretty Polly ( 15:24 )
07 - New prisoner's song ( 18:31 )
08 - Hard luck blues ( 21:23 )
09 - Lost love blues (24:21 )
10 - Will sweethearts know each other there! ( 27:29 )
11 - Old rub alcohol blues ( 30:22 )
12 - False hearted lover's blues ( 33:38 )
13 - Lost love blues (Unissued Alternate take #1) ( 37:10 )
14 - Will sweethearts know each other there! (Unissued alternate take #1) ( 42:08 )
15 - Old rub alcohol blues (Sole alternate take) ( 45:04 )
16 - Lost love blues (Unissued alternate take #2) ( 48:17 )
17 - Will sweethearts know each other there! (Unissued alternate take #2) ( 51:24 )
18 - Peddler and his wife (Hayes Shepherd) ( 54:24 )
19 - Hard for to love (Hayes Shepherd) ( 56:23 )
20 - Bound steel blues (Bill Shepherd) (59:46 )
21 - Aunt Jane blues (Bill Shepherd) ( 1:03:04 )

 

"Born in the mountain, raised in the bluff, we came to shake our feet and strut our stuff"